When Home is the Mouth of a Shark : Gendered Consequences for Syrian Women Refugees

I have been terribly negligent in keeping up this blog lately, but I have been writing and continuing field work in Turkey. There will be fresh updates and insights shortly, but for the time being I have this essay that was recently published on the Gender & Society blog – as always, I welcome thoughts, reactions, etc.

Gender & Society

By Stephanie J. Nawyn

The war in Syria has produced the largest refugee migration since World War II. According to estimates from the United Nations High Commission on Refugees, more than 4.8 million Syrians have fled into neighboring countries (with most experts agreeing that this is a conservative estimate), and are mostly entering Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan. In the last year many more Syrians have attempted to seek asylum in Europe. The conditions under which these refugees struggle to survive are not entirely unpredictable, as many refugees throughout recent history share sadly similar experiences. But the scale of the crisis and the socio-political climates in the countries providing (and not providing) safe harbor have created conditions for Syrians that are somewhat unique to their situation, with some having gendered consequences.

Crossing conflict zones to reach safe countries is always dangerous, but because of the size of this migration many surrounding…

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